2012 Oct Members’ Mtg

Sangres Art Guild Membership meeting:

held Thursday October 18 at 5:15 p.m. at the Cliff Lanes Community Room

Agenda

1. Introductions
2. House Rules
3. Board of Directors did not meet in October
4. Treasurer’s Report

  • Too soon after Hullabaloo and PAPO to balance & reconcile the books.
  • Very low sales this year at gallery; may get 20% of last year.
  • Guild finances: your Guild, your help is needed!
  • We are in bad need of help seeking grants and other sources of funding

5. Gallery stuff

  • Proposed: artist spaces in exchange for volunteering. Upstairs co-op like, downstairs still monthly rotating shows. Board-approved last month.  See 2013 Gallery Proposal.

6. Arts Hullabaloo – Angie

  • Thanks to Angie for putting it all together!!!
  • Successful despite cold weather.

7. Plein Air Paint-out – Curt

  • Thanks to Sarah, Lorie and Lynette to hanging the show, and to Southern Colorado Watercolor Society members June Galaz, Brenda Sell and Carol Farren for putting together the reception.
  • Successful despite cold weather; 27 artists, 74 entries + 57 in upstairs show. Two sales.

8. Announcements

  • Holiday Show – intake Nov. 3 & 4; displays through end of year
  • Board member expirations: at least three – think about serving and having it your way
  • KUDOS! Ken Hartman, Sharon Langfeldt, Sarah Woods, Lorie Batson – see web site!
  • KUDOS! Eve Nagode, two awards for her photos at the Arkansas Valley Artist Showcase
  • Next Month: Mary Morrison, Golden Open acrylic paints demonstration; free samples.
  • Other announcements?

9. New Business?

SHORT BREAK

PROGRAM

Sarah Woods discussed what artwork makes a good art print.

Minutes

This is a brief summary in lieu of official mintues (secretary absent).  Meeting started at 5:20 pm.  There were 11 members and/or guests attending.

Agenda item 4 (see above).  Five or six new members joined via the Plein Air Paint-out.

Agenda item 5, Gallery Stuff (See 2013 Gallery Proposal).  The review prior to replacing selling items needs to be discussed — how to keep up quality but allow prompt replacements.  Monday Art Group should get a space.  Could draw names to choose spaces, then rotate spaces during course of year.

Sarah would like to have have wrapped art prints available at the gallery for customers who see her work at Trombley’s Inn (and/or other B&B’s for example) and want to buy them.  Gallery would do sales and get commission.

There is a new rotating Art in Public Places site:  Round Mountain Water and Sanitation District office in the old Wells Fargo space.  The art can be changed out each quarter on the same day as the Colorado Mountain Bank change-out.

Thanks to the Monday Art Group for volunteering to hang the Holiday Show at the gallery.  Thanks Hulda and Gary for doing the intake and creating all of the wall tags.  Thanks also to Anne and Lucia for handling the reception, which has always been special and will no doubt be special again this year.

Program

Sarah Woods discussed what kind of art makes a good art print.  Here’s a synopsis:

  • Original artwork should be priced at 10-20 times that of what the print will sell at.
  • Women buy the art for households (except maybe for a “man-cave”).  Sarah described her observations of an art auction and how bidders raise their bid-plaques when they want to place a bid on an object:  “…every time she’d tap his thigh, his little thingy would pop up…”  Now there’s a famous quote for ya!  The take-home message is clear — women make the decisions!
  • Keep prints to standard sizes unless you will custom frame all of them.  Keeping standard sizes keeps framing costs down for customers.
  • Look at current popular color palettes for “in” fashion colors.  Original paintings are emotional purchases, prints are mostly decorative.
  • Think about making prints of “cute” subjects or small sizes for easeir sales.
  • General subjects (for example general mountain scenery) are easier sells than specific subjects (like a particular historic building).
  • Where you market your prints matters; specific landmarks subjects, for example, may sell well in that area, but not so well elsewhere.